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School Cancelled In Yakutia, Russia As Temperatures Plunge To -50C (-58F), Rare Late-Snows Hit Argentina, + Parts Of Antarctica Are Holding Unusually Cold

School Cancelled In Yakutia, Russia As Temperatures Plunge To -50C (-58F)

Pupils across at least ten villages in the remote Russian region of Yakutia have been ordered to stay at home and study via distance learning as the mercury outside touched -50C (-58F), reports rt.com.

On Monday, November 22, the local government instructed 700 students to stay at home after a low of -50C (-58F) was recorded in the village of Kylaiy, in the Ust-Aldan district of Yakutia province — not too far from the region’s largest city of Yakutsk.

Other notable lows in the province include the -45C (-49F) in Batamay; the -44.8C (-48.6F) in Kerbo, Central Siberia; the -39.6C (-39.3F) in Verkhoyansk.


The exemption has only been granted to young children, meaning some older students are still being told to attend lessons “depending on the temperature” — the mercury fell to -38C (-36.4F) on Monday in Yakutsk, where classes are going on as usual.

Much of Asia has been engulfed by strong Arctic air masses in recent weeks, and temperature departures of as much as -22C below the seasonal average have been suffered in the nations of Kazakhstan, Mongolia, and China, among others.


This early-season polar cold hasn’t just been confined to the land, either.

As reported by thetimes.co.uk, at least 20 ships remain stuck in sea ice off Russian coastlines after an ‘unexpected early freeze took shipping companies by surprise’ — some could be stranded for months as they await icebreakers, continues the article.

Unusually thick Arctic sea ice has trapped 20+ ships. Pictured above is the Mikhail Somov, a research vessel which had been travelling along the northern sea route. [VERA KOSTAMO/TASS/GETTY IMAGES]


In recent years, ships traversing Russia’s northern coast have had a relatively easy time of it in the months of October and November — but trends change, and this year, as our planet continues its descent into its next bout of global cooling, the ice is re-freezing early and quickly.

Large parts of the remote Arctic waters were covered in thick sea-ice by late October, reports thebarentsobserver.com, “and the white sheet is quickly getting thicker and harder to navigate.”

Arctic sea ice has now topped 10 million km2 (10.17 million as of Nov 21st) — the second highest ice extent of any of the last 15 years. Additionally, the years 2008 and 2005 are on course to be eclipsed in the coming days/weeks, as are many from the early-2000s and mid/late-1990s, meaning that 2021 will soon claim the title of ‘the highest Arctic sea ice extent of the past two decades’ (since 2001).

For more on that, see:

Below is footage of an icy Lena river-crossing (to Yakutia, Russia) on Nov 22:


Rare Late-Snows Hit Argentina

The Argentinian city of Ushuaia woke up under a blanket of snow this week, just a month out from summer.

Record-challenging flakes began settling on the Tierra del Fuego capital –located on the southernmost tip of South America– in the early hours of Monday morning:


Overnight lows of -2C (28.4F) accompanied the snows, but it didn’t put off these Ushuaia revelers:


According to the Argentina’s National Meteorological Service (SMN), and as reported by radio3cadenapatagonia.com.ar, the inclement weather continued throughout the morning, with additional “heavy snowfalls” more akin to June or July (the region’s deepest winter months) accumulating, even in downtown Ushuaia “at a time when clearing operations were not planned.”

Unexpected snows also disrupted traffic on the key National Route No. 3 which connects the Fuegian capital with the provincial north. — the flurries here were even more intense, and authorities recommended that drivers refit their winter tires.

Parts Of Antarctica Are Holding Unusually Cold

Despite MSM protestations and misleading reporting, Antarctica is suffering a record cold 2021.

As I reported last month, the South Pole logged its coldest 6-month spell in recorded history.

Between the months of April and September, the South Pole averaged a temperature of -61.1C (-78F). Simply put, this was the region’s coldest 6-month spell ever recorded, comfortably usurping the previous coldest ‘coreless winter‘ on record — the -60.6C (-77F) set back in 1976 (solar minimum of weak cycle 20).

And now, in late-November, and so well into the Antarctic summer, the unusual chill is persisting: Dome A and Concordia are still registering “very rare readings of below -50C (-58F),” according to data compiled by @extremetemps on Twitter.

Concordia Research Station, a French–Italian research facility built 3,233 m (10,600 ft) above sea level on the Antarctic Plateau, actually dipped to -52.1C (-61.8F) on Sunday, November 21. It is incredibly rare to see temperatures this low so late into the season. Worth noting: Antarctica’s coldest-ever December temperature stands at -52C (-61.6F).

Image


And finally, in Europe: western, central, and northern nations are contending with a powerful Arctic front this week.

It’s -1.4C (29.5F) as I type this (in the SW UK); but up in Scandinavia, mainland Europe’s coldest reading of the season has just been registered — the -29C (-20.2F) in Utsjoki Kevo Kevojärvi, Finland:


The COLD TIMES are returning, the mid-latitudes are REFREEZING, in line with the great conjunction, historically low solar activitycloud-nucleating Cosmic Rays, and a meridional jet stream flow (among other forcings).

Both NOAA and NASA appear to agree, if you read between the lines, with NOAA saying we’re entering a ‘full-blown’ Grand Solar Minimum in the late-2020s, and NASA seeing this upcoming solar cycle (25) as “the weakest of the past 200 years”, with the agency correlating previous solar shutdowns to prolonged periods of global cooling here.

Furthermore, we can’t ignore the slew of new scientific papers stating the immense impact The Beaufort Gyre could have on the Gulf Stream, and therefore the climate overall.


Prepare accordingly— learn the facts, relocate if need be, and grow your own.

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Grand Solar Minimum + Pole Shift

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10 Thoughts to “School Cancelled In Yakutia, Russia As Temperatures Plunge To -50C (-58F), Rare Late-Snows Hit Argentina, + Parts Of Antarctica Are Holding Unusually Cold”

  1. Bwana Neusi

    We very much appreciate your no nonsense reporting on the the true state of the climate. Keep it up and thanks.

  2. Andrew J Ulsaker

    This is rare nowadays but the poles have flipped and now the Arctic is below average with Antarctica above which is why you see the ice extent lagging around Antarctica…
    ….

  3. Atom man

    In this and coming winters we will need all the electric power we can get – from whatever source – those who have discontinued coal and nuclear sources for electric generation will live to regret those decisions despite the waste and pollution problems they are said to pose. While I do not claim to be a latter day prophet, in a dream I recently had a voice announced that we are entering “a time of EXTREME rationing” – electric power, fuel oil for heating, gasoline, food – or all 4 since they are connected by motor transport and pipelines??

    1. Johna

      Coal is more essential as it’s more effective than nuclear. We can rapidly ramp up gas (CH4, H2, Ethylene) electricity oil and chemicals from coal as well as more transport by rail – electrified and modern steam power. In fact in many places the world over there has been no economic or social gain in using diesel locomotives – even in the US. With modern clean burning technology there is also no smoke and less NOx and VOC’s than burning oil in IC engines – the main cause of respiratory illness and death (and exacerbating the urban heat island effect). Moreover in the event of this SM morphing into the next ice age reverting to coal will mean far less nuclear waste is strewn across vast swathes of land when the ice age hits. We also need coordinated electrical power from countries with good PV output and hydro power that’s also unaffected by the ice. Theirs also great scope to have lots more tidal barrages for continuous sinusoidal electricity. The issue then is; who controls the middle ground between the 40NS parallel’s?

  4. Deb

    This link is more apropos to this article than the previous one where I posted it.

    It’s a 45 minute interview with an Austrian energy expert on the current state of energy production in Austria/Europe and what can be expected in the near future regarding blackouts, brownouts, possible CME, including ramifications such as effects on cell phones, hospital generators, traffic jams and many other topics.

    Very informative and much of it applicable to the US.

    https://youtu.be/LYHlH53gxS4

    1. Johna

      Deb, This guy is only saying what we energy engineers and industrial economists have been saying for years, i.e. all of this is applicable to the USA and all countries that have, or are going to follow the stupid policies of the UN, as it’s their political stooges and the MSM who are causing this issue. Coal is more essential to use again as it’s far more effective, safer and cheaper than nuclear – and there is no Nuclear fusion on the horizon either. For example, we can rapidly get continuous 24/7/365 electricity, CH4, H2, Ethylene, oil and a myriad of chemicals from coal. We can also move goods by having more electrified rail lines and use modern coal burning steam power. In fact in many places the world over there has been no economic or social gain in using diesel locomotives – even in the USA – this was proven in the 1950’s and 1985 by many US railroads and in 2002 by the JPL. With modern clean coal burning technology there is also no smoke and less NOx and VOC’s than burning oil in IC engines – the main cause of respiratory illness and death (and exacerbating the urban heat island effect). Moreover even if this SM doesn’t morph into the next ice age, reverting to coal will mean far less nuclear waste, as when the next ice age does hit less of it will be strewn across vast swathes of land. We also need coordinated electrical power from countries with good PV output and hydro power that’s also unaffected by the ice. And there is great scope to have lots more tidal barrages for continuous sinusoidal electricity. The issue then is; who controls the middle ground between the 40NS parallel’s in the next ice age?

  5. Deb

    The micronova ought to take care of the heating problem for awhile, lol.

    As for who’s in charge during the ice age, who do you think is in charge right now?

    1. Johna

      Hope the heats on for a while yet as I’m going back to bolster Scotland’s armed forces – we need to re run the battle of Prestonpans and rule England properly this time. Don’t worry we’ve got al the RN subs in Glasgow locked and loaded lol. Also somewhat not sure if a Micro Nova can do that? But defo SC’s 25/6/7 is going to cool us down and may indeed morph into the next ice age?? In which case I think its gonabe curtains for said rulers – hope so lol

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